Leaving academia after your PhD or postdoc, where to start?

Leaving academia after your PhD or postdoc, where to start? sagitta peters coach loopbaancoaching burnout coaching, coaching voor hoger opgeleiden, academici, universiteit, promovendi, technici, ingenieurs, engineers, academic staff, phd students, postdocs, university, eindhoven, utrecht, amsterdam, nijmegen, rotterdam, tilburg, career coaching, expats, international, english

Hi! Are you a PhD or postdoc and thinking of your next career step, maybe leaving academia? To start with the good news: almost all professionals with a PhD degree in the Netherlands are employed! On the other hand, although many PhD students start with the ambition of an academic career, only twenty percent finds employment in the academic world. Of whom even fewer become full professor…

Along the road quite some PhD students and postdocs realize that they will be happier with, or better suited for, a career outside the university. However, your supervisor mainly knows the academic world or is focused on research only. In the end, career orientation is not always getting the attention it deserves. So what to do if you would like to or if you’re forced to find a job outside the university? Here I will share some tips on where to start when planning to leave academia after your PhD or postdoc.

You’re not the only one leaving academia

The numbers above tell it all. About eighty percent leaves the academic world, and only a few percent makes it as a full professor. And still, quite some people think that they are alone in their struggles about what to do… But no, you are not! You just don’t know of the others. Therefore it is good to share your thoughts about leaving academia with your colleagues, friends or in the PhD association. In this way, you won’t feel as lonely, you can learn from and support each other and celebrate successes.

Skills

Your PhD title is not getting you a job. Employers outside academia (companies, government, education etc) value the professional skills you most probably have gained as a PhD student, for instance working independently, project-based working, written communication skills including writing papers, and presenting. In addition, they often regards your research skills, obtained by working on a really specific topic, as important.

Your training program

You can strengthen these skills even further by doing some courses (often offered in the training program of your university). In this way you might get a head start over the others applying for the same job. You might also think of developing new skills by following courses about for example guiding students, giving feedback (because these are relevant for collaborating), planning, project management etc. Moreover, these courses will also help you to get more insight in the type of tasks and work you would like to do.

If you’re an international working in the Netherlands (or any other country) and you plan on pursuing your career in that same country, it might be wise to learn the language.

Know what you have to offer

The skills mentioned above are often called transferrable skills. You can use them in a variety of situations and jobs. In addition to these, you will also have more content related skills and knowledge: in depth knowledge about a certain topic, procedure or method. Or think of skills for building a certain set-up or programming a robot.

Last but not least, there is the group of self-management skills (qualities or strengths in other words ). Here you can think of being open, honest, communicative, dedicated, detailed, humorous, adventurous, observant, idealistic, quick learner.

Knowing about your skills and strengths makes it easier to see if a certain job will fit you. On the other hand, it will also give you a good basis for job interviews, as you can more easily answer the questions of the employer.

Explore new worlds

There are many more options for fulfilling careers outside academia than you initially might think of. Check your LinkedIn feed for ideas, just by noticing the organisation other people work for. If it makes you curious, read more about that organisation and what they do (and how). You might also notice the variety of jobs people work in, for instance research and development, marketing, consultancy, production, services, education, management, sales, policy making, communication etc. There are many non-research jobs at universities as well.

At career fairs you get the chance to talk to employees from several organisations quite easily and with a relatively low investment of time. It will also help you in broadening your network – more about that in the next paragraphs! And although the impression you get there might not be the complete picture, it will give some directions.

Your network has lots of knowledge

You might not always really realize it, but your neighbours, family members, high school friends, and team members of your sports team, they all have (had) a professional life as well. Jobs in a variety of areas and organisations. They will very likely be happy to share their experiences with you.

Did I already mention your network?

Let me be clear. I’m not a huge fan of going to drinks and exchanging as many cards as possible with whoever you will meet. It doesn’t fit me, and I also don’t think it has too much use either. However, getting in contact with people that I can help, or who can help me, based on some similarities or shared interests, that I do like. It has brought me lots of good stuff, like knowledge, projects and new clients.

Getting into contact with professionals who can help you is not that difficult. You can ask a shared contact to introduce you, or you send them a message yourself. A short and kind email, with a clear reason, question or goal of your request is key. And if you go for coffee or lunch, be the one that pays for it 😉

If the above didn’t convince you, be aware that these days about only about thirty percent of all vacancies are advertises in the ‘conventional’ way (job advertisements in the newspaper, on the internet, LinkedIn etc). About seventy percent of these vacancies have been filled in other ways, often network related. You won’t know if you will be one of those lucky ones, however when people do not know about you, you will miss the boat for sure.

You are not your work

We tend to say: I AM a researcher, I AM a PhD student or I AM postdoc, but actually you WORK as a PhD student or postdoc or researcher. Your job is obviously connected to who you are, but it is not the same. So when you change jobs, or need to re-adjust your career wishes, and you are afraid of what people might when you would be leaving academia think please don’t worry too much. Because you will still be a nice and valuable person and a good friend/partner/child/…

You are not your work. This also implies that that there are many more jobs you can do. Therefore thinking of all the skills (both self-management and transferrable) and knowledge you have is a way better starting point.

Start today

As you might have concluded form the above, career orientation takes time. Doing some research, meeting people, doing a training and reflection of who you are and what you can do, it all will take time. In the last year of your PhD, while finishing your research and writing your thesis, that’s exactly the thing most people do not have. Also when you’re at the end of your postdoc contract and as a result want to finish as much as you can, time is probably not your best friend either… So start in time, better today than tomorrow, and make some time for it!

Do you want to read more?

I’ve published more blogs about career, personal development and burnout. You’ll find them here. You can also follow me on LinkedIn.

Do you need some support?

Do you have questions about your personal development or career (maybe thinking about leaving academia?) and do you want to learn more about how I can help you with that?
Or do you experience burnout or other stress related symptoms?
Please contact me to plan a thirty minute introductory meeting (without obligations and free of charge). This will give you an impression how we could work on your questions or goals. After this meeting you can decide if you like to start coaching with me or not.

On my English page you can read more about career coaching and burnout coaching and my way of working.

I’m looking forward to meeting you!

Photo Leaving academia after your PhD or postdoc: Ross Findon via Unsplash

Reasons I love working as a coach

Sagitta Peters career and burnout coaching Eindhoven reasons I love working as a coach, reasons I love coaching, sagitta peters coach loopbaancoaching burnout coaching, coaching voor hoger opgeleiden, academici, universiteit, promovendi, technici, ingenieurs, engineers, academic staff, phd students, postdocs, university, eindhoven, utrecht, amsterdam, nijmegen, rotterdam, tilburg, career coaching, expats, international, english

Some people openly ask me what I love about my job. Others might wonder… With a scientific and technological education and having worked in such an environment for several years, it has been quite a journey to embrace some parts of myself again. In fact, not using and even neglecting these ‘softer’ sides had also contributed to forgetting who I truly was.

Since I am working as a coach, everything has fallen into place. By accepting who I am (no matter what) I am now able to use my sensitivity, intuition and interest in human drivers and behaviour and let them complement that pragmatic and problem-solving approach and knowledge of leadership and management I used before so much.

For those who wonder why I am so happy working as a coach, and for those who would just like to learn to know me better, I like to give a sneak peak into the reasons I love working as a coach!

Reasons I love working as a coach

All the stories that people share and the different views on life they have, make me conscious, humble and make me appreciate and consider life on a different level.
I love people, knowledge transfer and teaching.
I really want to make the world a better and happier place. I believe that people who really embrace themselves will be more kind and accepting to other people. (My company has a sustainable bank account and eco friendly coffee, tea and chocolate as well 😉)
Coaching implies working towards a goal.
One-on-one contact and working in small groups fits my character well.
Simply being there for the other, without having to spread my attention and focus, feels special.
Having the autonomy to do my work as I like it, following my own values.
Personal development is important for me. Learning new things makes me happy and I love encouraging others in their personal development.
I love making plans, developing workshops and trainings, writing blogs…
It is my deep belief that everyone should have a job that makes truly happy and gives at least as much energy as it costs (and preferably much more!!). Supporting people to get there is valuable and rewarding.
I like to contribute to the knowledge that employers, colleagues and partners have of burnout and of course to the recovery of individuals experiencing burnout.
And last but not least, I love that I meet great people every day.

Why do you love your work? Would be great if you’ll let me know!

On my blog you can read more articles about career, personal development and burnout. Do you want to get in touch? Please contact me!

Workshop career orientation at TU/e PhD Event

Workshop-PhD-event-May-24-2019-a-structured-approach-for-career orientation, sagitta peters coach loopbaancoaching burnout coaching, coaching voor hoger opgeleiden, academici, universiteit, promovendi, technici, ingenieurs, engineers, academic staff, phd students, postdocs, university, eindhoven, utrecht, amsterdam, nijmegen, rotterdam, tilburg, career coaching, expats, international, english

The Eindhoven University of Technology yearly organizes a career event for PhD students. I’m really happy to be one of this year’s workshop leaders. In a two hour workshop we will work on a structured approach for career orientation. Because I truly believe that there is a dream job for everyone, and that an inside-out approach is the way to find yours!

Who will be there as well on May 24 2019?

Abstract:
Towards your dream job: a structured approach for career orientation

Orientation for a job after your PhD is often quite overwhelming. Where should you start and what should you do, to get a better view on the career perspectives that really reflect your personality and strengths?
In this workshop you will get a framework for your orientation process. We will also look deeper into the three questions that are important in this approach: Who are you? What are your capabilities? And what do you like to do? Via exercises you will get the first answers and you will end the workshop defining the next steps you can take in your personal orientation.

Ten important questions when considering a major career step

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Do you feel that it might be getting time to explore new career options? Or do you know someone for whom this counts? Then continue reading!
If your current job doesn’t fit you anymore and you are considering a major career step, a thorough self-analysis (and maybe a bit of soul-searching) can reveal what type of job will make you happy. It will help you to get a better view of your work and life goals, the type of work you love to do and excel in, the organisational culture that connects with your values and the environment you will flourish in.
In fact, this type of self-examination is also worth doing when you are happy with your work, so that you can adjust in time to stay that way. But how do you start such a reflective self-analysis?

Questions to ask yourself

Below I share ten important questions to guide you in your self-reflection. Without further ado, in a short but sweet list (let me know if I should provide a printable pdf on my website):

1. How was I as a kid, how did I grow up?

2. What do I stand for in life today?

3. Do I really aspire a new job, or do I run away from problems that I will face in another environment as well?

4. What are my strong assets (strengths, skills, talents)? When do they flourish?

5. What gives me energy?

6. Which fields or skills do I want to develop further?

7. What is my dream job (astronaut, musician, …) and what does this say about me?

8. What I don’t want anymore?

9. Which aspects should I take into account as well (from commuting to finance and cancellation period)?

10. What or who holds me back?

Which questions where eye openers for you when considering a major career step? Which ones should I add? Let me know!

Do you want to read more?

Here you’ll find more blogs with tips, information and more personal experiences. You can also follow me on LinkedIn.

Do you have questions about your personal development or career and do you want to learn more about how I can help you with that? Or do you experience burnout or other stress symptoms? Please contact me to plan an introductory meeting. This 30 minute meeting is without obligations and free of charge. It will give you an impression how we could work on your questions or goals. After this meeting you can decide if you will start coaching sessions with me or not.
On my English page you can read more about career and burnout coaching and my way of working.

I’m looking forward to meeting you!

Photo credits: Samuel Zeller via Unsplash


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pdf download Sagitta Peters Ten important questions when considering a major career step